Thanks, Adam. I appreciate the additional data. I note in the study on women objectifying other women that the researchers found that the incidence of woman to woman objectification was less than men to women objectification. I also note, they say self-objectification happens less than woman to woman objectification. Which is quite interesting.

All the research I’ve seen though, including the articles you include, say objectification has negative outcomes, EXCEPT, as the one study I mention in the article points out, in trusting relationships. So, your point that it’s really about the who and when is well-taken.

I find it difficult to say people ‘want’ to be objectified in general though, or that the problem isn’t objectification. I think people want to be admired and respected. But admiring someone for how they look is very different from objectifying him or her. Objectifying reducing a person to a part. Admiring someone’s body part isn’t the same as objectifying him or her. I don’t think objectification in all situations is always bad. But, I think we should be very very thoughtful of when it’s appropriate and when it’s just dehumanizing.

Certainly, objectification isn’t the ONLY problem with negative body issues or sex-related violence, or an appearance-obsessed world, but it seems clear based on the overwhelming evidence that it’s a piece of the puzzle.

I think saying in general we all ‘want’ to be objectified is like saying we all ‘want’ to eat junk food all the time. Sure, there are those that do. But, one can’t live on that kind of stuff and expect it to lead to health and happiness.

I sincerely appreciate the opportunity to exchange ideas with you. Thank you for taking the time. We might not agree — but I value the conversation.

Drawing from life experience and a master’s in organizational leadership, I write about parenting, leading, relationships, and personal growth.

Drawing from life experience and a master’s in organizational leadership, I write about parenting, leading, relationships, and personal growth.